Re: Sika Technical Services Inquiry

Fm

ionmars@themarspioneer.com

To

Elvis Torres

Dat

2014-07-10 17:12

Mr. Torres 

Thank you for your advice.  I will be actively studying the capabilities of Anchorfix 2 Arctic.

Roy Paul

(IonMars)

 

On 2014-07-10 07:35, Elvis Torres wrote:

Mr. Paul

This is a very interesting task you have been put in charge to overcome. I agree with you in your point, due to the lack of air pressure, working with a product that requires water would be close to impossible. Our grouts and mortars are used in the repairing part of the construction business, so using one of them as a conventional brick/paver mortar would be out of its comfort zone. The Sikacrete 950DP that you had mentioned is a admixture which is added to a concrete mix to change its characteristics, so it wouldn't be of help to you. Cementitious products may be tough to use as well. To shoot you an idea, you can try and experiment with our AnchorFix 2 Arctic. This Product is in a cartridge, so you would use a caulking gun to dispense the material. It has 2 components, which are mixed in a nozzle. I have attached the product data sheet for you to review.

 

Regards,

Elvis Torres

National Technical Service Specialist

Refurbishment, Sealing and Bonding

Sika - US - Lyndhurst

201 Polito Avenue - Lyndhurst NJ 07071

Phone: 201-508-6749 Fax: 201-507-7107

==========================================

From: ionmars@themarspioneer.com

To: Elvis Torres

Date: 07/09/2014 02:53 PM

Subject: Re: Sika Technical Services Inquiry

 

Mr. Torres

Thank you for directing me to some of your cementitious products; I think we are on the right track. I like the products you pointed out and each have some desirable characteristics. I would like to clarify the conditions on Mars a little further.

Daytime temperatures near the equator have been regularly measured above freezing, but nighttime can plunge rapidly to -80 degrees C. Almost no atmosphere means almost no air pressure, 0.01 psi. It is this lack of pressure that most bothers me.

I have recommended building with stone blocks because we can cut them from basalt readily found on the surface. This is an alternative to producing bricks, which will require heavy kiln equipment to be hauled from Earth. The stone blocks will be stacked in place and melted or sintered along the edges with a methane torch. More details are in the article "Pioneer House Building" on our website themarspioneer.com

So I am looking for an alternative to sintering the edges of stone blocks, a time consuming activity. Standard masonry grout would not work, from my experience, because the low pressure would cause the water to dissipate so rapidly that it would not set. I was glad that you directed me to SikaGrout 328 which has an extended working time. I was thinking that building with stone blocks would proceed much like brick masonry on Earth with some adaptations to Mars. The grout would be prepared in very small batches, a one or two-gallon container with built-in heaters to maintain temperature as close as possible to 70 degrees F. The mortar would be spread on blocks already in place. And then one block would be quickly placed next to the grouted surfaces. I don't know how to prevent it from being exposed to the low air pressure, so could SikaGrout 328 work? If NASA became interested, perhaps we could run tests on the Space Station.

Another product of interest was SikaCrete 950DP. It is described as exhibiting pozzolanic action, creating a gel that increases strength and decreases permeability dramatically. This is important because a Mars house will have to be airtight. In fact the tensile strength will be more important than compressive strength because interior air pressure could blow apart a lightly constructed vessel.

What product(s) do you think would be more likely to work, or is this an impossible task?

Roy Paul

(IonMars)

==================================================

 

On 2014-07-09 10:05, Elvis Torres wrote:

Hello

Thank you again for your interest in Sika products. Due to the specific requirements, the air pressure and etc., we do not know what would be the best choice for you. Epoxies at those temperatures would be too brittle, so cementitious would most likely be the way to go. Please take a look at our cementitious line of products. I have attached the links

SIKAQUICK line (take a look at Sikaquick VOH)

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown/sikaquick-pds.html

 

SIKACRETE line

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown/sikacrete-pds.html

 

SIKAGROUT line (take a look at SikaGrout 328)

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown/sikagrout-pds.html

 

SIKAREPAIR line (another good choice)

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown.html?CFC__target=http://us01.webdms.sika.com/embedded/search/search.do&selectedDoctypeIDs=7&selectedLevelID=7&selectedClassificationID=104&orderBy=1&orderDir=1

 

Thank you

 

 Elvis Torres

 National Technical Service Specialist

 Refurbishment, Sealing and Bonding

 Sika - US - Lyndhurst

 201 Polito Avenue - Lyndhurst NJ 07071

 Phone: 201-508-6749 Fax: 201-507-7107

 ===========================================

 From: ionmars@themarspioneer.com

 To: US Lyndhurst Technical Services Inbox

 Date: 07/03/2014 06:38 PM

 Subject: Re: Sika Technical Services Inquiry

 

Dear Mr. Torres

 

 Thank you for your reply. As you may infer from our website name, we recommend how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration should construct a colony on the planet Mars. The environment is extremely low air pressure and very low nighttime temperature, like the Arctic.

So we are building a stone block structure in arctic-like conditions and perhaps Alaskans have some insight into how to do it. Standard mortar wouldn't work so maybe resins?

 

 Thank you for any advice.

 

  Roy Paul

  (IonMars)

==============================================

  On 2014-07-03 15:00, US Lyndhurst Technical Services Inbox wrote:

 

 Hello Mr.Paul

 

 Thank you for your interest in Sika products. I have two questions: what is the reason for the specific parameters? How big is the repair?

 

 Thank you, have a great 4th of July

 

 Elvis R Torres

 National Technical Service Specialist

 

 SIKA CORPORATION

 Technical Services Department (Target Market:

 Commercial - Refurbishment / Sealing & Bonding)

 201 Polito Avenue, Lyndhurst, NJ 07071

 Ph: 800-933-SIKA (7452), option # 5

 ===========================================

Links:

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[1]

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown/sikaquick-pds.html

[2]

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown/sikacrete-pds.html

[3]

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown/sikagrout-pds.html

[4]

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown.html?CFC__target=http://us01.webdms.sika.com/embedded/search/search.do&selectedDoctypeIDs=7&selectedLevelID=7&selectedClassificationID=104&orderBy=1&orderDir=1

[5]

http://usa.sika.com/en/solutions_products/download/doc_download/iframe_and_dropdown.html?CFC__target=http://us01.webdms.sika.com/embedded/search/search.do&selectedDoctypeIDs=7&selectedLevelID=7&selectedClassificationID=104&orderBy=1&orderDir=1